Cyclone

Caption: ‘Protection Zone’ consisting of concrete walls and demountable flood barriers at the low-lying fishing village of Tai O in Lantau Island, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
For the urban coastal city of Hong Kong, typhoons are a regular occurrence from May to October. Consequently, Hong Kong’s infrastructure is designed to cope with the strong winds, floods, and storm surges they bring. Recently, however, the territory experienced two powerful storms in consecutive years. In 2017, Super Typhoon Hato struck the region, and in the following year, the city witnessed Super Typhoon Mangkhut, the strongest typhoon since 1983. But Hong Kong suffered lower economic losses from both storms when compared with the neighboring Guangdong region and the city of Macau, thanks partly to its well-coordinated response and resilient infrastructure.
MCR2030  Asia Pacific webinar photo
Over the last 20 years, disasters in Asia-Pacific have become more numerous and expensive, and cities are where the impacts of these disasters are most acutely felt. Climate change is one large driver of risk, but urbanization and the increase in
United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Asia and Pacific
ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability
United Cities and Local Governments Asia-Pacific
Bangkok
Governance paper cover with governance word cloud
This paper examines the disaster risk governance structures in Asia-Pacific and provides recommendations on how they can be strengthened.
two construction engineer working in construction site and management in the construction site.
Following on from the Asia-Pacific Partnership for Disaster Risk Reduction (APP-DRR) Forum, a series of thematic consultations were organized to identify priority actions to be considered at the 2021 Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction (APMCDRR).
Eco-DRR report cover
The purpose of this policy paper is to increase awareness of the important role of ecosystem-based approaches in reducing disaster risk. It emphasises the central role of ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction (Eco-DRR) in strengthening the coherent implementation of various international frameworks under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
Eco-DRR report cover
The purpose of this policy paper is to increase awareness of the important role of ecosystem-based approaches in reducing disaster risk. It emphasises the central role of ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction (Eco-DRR) in strengthening the coherent implementation of various international frameworks under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It further provides suggestions on how to capitalise on the growing evidence-base for strengthening the integration of Eco-DRR and other nature-based solutions (NbS), such as ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) into disaster risk reduction strategies and national development plans and highlights the usefulness of Eco-DRR in systemic risk management, using examples and good practices from the Asia-Pacific region and other parts of the world.